Faculty in the Congressionally Chartered National Academies


National Academy of Medicine (NAM)

Walter Menniger

W. Walter Menninger

Clinical Professor
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Services

William Walter Menninger is a doctor and psychiatrist in the third generation of the Menninger family, which has run the Menninger Foundation since 1925. He served as dean of the Karl Menninger School of Psychiatry and Mental Health Science and he was the CEO of the Menninger Clinic from the 1993 to 2001. Menninger has special interests in psychoanalysis and forensic psychiatry. His research with Peace Corps volunteers resulted in his development of the Menninger morale curve, a schematic used to predict responses among people who are in new environments.


National Academy of Engineering (NAE)

Brian McClendon

Brian McClendon

Adjunct Professor of the Practice
Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science

Brian McClendon is the Vice President of Advanced Technologies at Uber, where he oversees a number of initiatives, including Uber’s Advanced Technologies Center and mapping. Prior to joining Uber in 2015, McClendon was a vice president with Google. He was a co-founder of Keyhole, Inc., a geospatial data visualization company that was purchased by Google to produce Google Earth, a technology that has fundamentally changed the way we conceptualize our world. McClendon grew up in Lawrence and graduated from the University of Kansas in 1986 with a degree in electrical engineering.

Ross E. McKinney

Ross E. McKinney

NT Veatch Distinguished Professor Emeritus
Civil Engineering

McKinney was the first NT Veatch Distinguished Professor of Civil Engineering and a recipient of the 1992 Chancellors Club Career Teaching Award. He left the faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1960 with a desire for his research to stand out beyond the MIT brand. His advanced approach to biological engineering of waste-water treatment did much more, generating international acclaim. He received dozens of awards including a 1985 Award of Excellence from students and the 1982 Thomas R. Camp Medal and a 1991 international award from the Water Pollution Control Federation. His research and design were behind more than 75 municipal and industrial treatment plants, and during his 32-year career he trained more than 200 graduate students who have gone on to design systems worldwide.

Alan Mulally

Alan Mulally

Adjunct Distinguished Professor
Aerospace Engineering and Business

Alan Mulally served as president and chief executive officer of Ford Motor Company and was a member of the company’s Board of Directors from 2006 to 2014. Prior to joining Ford, Mulally served as executive vice president of The Boeing Company and president and chief executive officer of Boeing Commercial Airplanes. He has sat on the advisory boards of NASA, the University of Kansas, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. He also served as a past president of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Mulally holds degrees in aeronautical and astronautical engineering from the University of Kansas.

Stanley T. Rolfe

Stanley T. Rolfe

Albert P. Learned Distinguished Professor
Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering

Stan Rolfe earned his bachelor’s degree, master’s degree and doctorate in civil engineering from the University of Illinois in 1956, 1958 and 1962, respectively. He spent seven years at U.S. Steel’s research laboratory before bringing his expertise to the civil engineering program at KU in 1969. As the Alfred P. Learned Distinguished Professor of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, his leadership in fracture mechanics and fatigue helped build the university into a global leader in steel and concrete research.

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Paul Willhite

Paul Willhite

Ross H. Forney Distinguished Professor
Chemical and Petroleum Engineering

Willhite’s contributions to the field of petroleum engineering earned him the Improved Oil Recovery Pioneer Award at the 14th Society of Petroleum Engineers/Department of Energy Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery in 2004. He is the recipient of the John Franklin Carll Award, the Lester C. Uren Award and the Distinguished Achievement Award for Petroleum Engineering Faculty, each from the Society of Petroleum Engineers. He holds numerous U.S. patents. He has served in a variety of leadership roles at the department, school and university level during his tenure at KU. He is a distinguished member of the SPE and a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, Tau Beta Pi and the American Society for Engineering Education.

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National Academy of Sciences (NAS)

Scott Hawley

Scott Hawley

Professor of Molecular and Integrative Physiology
KU School of Medicine

Scott Hawley is known worldwide for his seminal work on meiosis, a specialized type of cell division that sets the stage for sexual reproduction. In an orderly, stepwise fashion, maternal and paternal chromosomes pair up, exchange genetic material, and then separate. The tightly controlled process halves the number of chromosomes carried by sperm and egg cells and thus allows the genes of two parents to be combined without increasing the total number of chromosomes. In recognition of both his research and teaching activities, Hawley was selected as an American Cancer Society Research Professor and is also the recipient of the GSA’s 2008 Excellence in Education Award.

Joe Lutkenhaus

Joe Lutkenhaus, Ph.D.

Distinguished Professor, Microbiology
Molecular Genetics and Immunology

Joe Lutkenhaus, Ph.D. is a University Distinguished Professor of Microbiology, Molecular Genetics and Immunology at the KU Medical Center. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2014. In 2012 he was a recipient of the Louisa Gross Horwitz Award for Biology and Biochemistry from Columbia University. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology and has received the Higuchi Research and Chancellor’s Club Research Awards from the University of Kansas and a Merit Award from NIH.

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